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Residential magnetic fields exposure and childhood leukemia: a population-based case–control study in California

Authors
  • Kheifets, Leeka1
  • Crespi, Catherine M.2
  • Hooper, Chris3
  • Cockburn, Myles4
  • Amoon, Aryana T.1
  • Vergara, Ximena P.1, 5
  • 1 UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, 650 Charles E Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA, 90024, USA , Los Angeles (United States)
  • 2 UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Los Angeles, CA, 90024, USA , Los Angeles (United States)
  • 3 Enertech Consultants, Campbell, CA, 95008, USA , Campbell (United States)
  • 4 University of Southern California, Department of Preventive Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, 90089, USA , Los Angeles (United States)
  • 5 Electric Power Research Institute, Energy and Environment, Palo Alto, CA, 94304, USA , Palo Alto (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cancer Causes & Control
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Sep 12, 2017
Volume
28
Issue
10
Pages
1117–1123
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10552-017-0951-6
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

PurposeStudies have reported an increased risk of childhood leukemia associated with exposure to magnetic fields. We conducted a large records-based case–control study of childhood leukemia risk and exposure to magnetic fields from power lines in California.MethodsThe study included 5,788 childhood leukemia cases (born in and diagnosed in California 1986–2008) matched to population-based controls on age and sex. We calculated magnetic fields at birth addresses using geographic information systems, aerial imagery, historical information on load and phasing, and site visits.ResultsBased on unconditional logistic regression controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status using subjects geocoded to a basic standard of accuracy, we report a slight risk deficit in two intermediate exposure groups and a small excess risk in the highest exposure group (odds ratio of 1.50 (95% confidence interval [0.70, 3.23])). Subgroup and sensitivity analyses as well as matched analyses gave similar results. All estimates had wide confidence intervals.ConclusionOur large, statewide, record-based case–control study of childhood leukemia in California does not in itself provide clear evidence of risk associated with greater exposure to magnetic fields from power lines, but could be viewed as consistent with previous findings of increased risk.

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