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A re-sequencing-based ultra-dense genetic map reveals a gummy stem blight resistance-associated gene in Cucumis melo.

Authors
  • Hu, Zhongyuan1
  • Deng, Guancong1
  • Mou, Haipeng1
  • Xu, Yuhui2
  • Chen, Li2
  • Yang, Jinghua1, 3, 4
  • Zhang, Mingfang1, 3, 4
  • 1 Laboratory of Germplasm Innovation and Molecular Breeding, Institute of Vegetable Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China. , (China)
  • 2 Biomarker Technologies Corporation, Beijing 101300, China. , (China)
  • 3 Key Laboratory of Horticultural Plant Growth, Development & Quality Improvement, Ministry of Agriculture, Hangzhou 310058, China. , (China)
  • 4 Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Horticultural Plant Integrative Biology, Hangzhou 310058, China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
DNA research : an international journal for rapid publication of reports on genes and genomes
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2018
Volume
25
Issue
1
Pages
1–10
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/dnares/dsx033
PMID: 28985339
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The melon (Cucumis melo) genome and genetic maps with hundreds to thousands of single nucleotide polymorphism markers were recently released. However, a high-resolution genetic map was lacking. Gummy stem blight (Gsb) is a destructive disease responsible for considerable economic losses during melon production. We herein describe the development of an ultra-dense genetic map consisting of 12,932 recombination bin markers covering 1,818 cM, with an average distance of 0.17 cM between adjacent tags. A comparison of the genetic maps for melon, watermelon, and cucumber revealed chromosome-level syntenic relationships and recombination events among the three Cucurbitaceae species. Our genetic map was useful for re-anchoring the genome scaffolds of melon. More than 92% assembly was anchored to 12 pseudo-chromosomes and 90% of them were oriented. Furthermore, 1,135 recombination hotspots revealed an unbalanced recombination rate across the melon genome. Genetic analyses of the Gsb-resistant and -susceptible lines indicated the resistance phenotype is mediated by a single dominant gene. We identified Gsb-resistance gene candidates in a 108-kb region on pseudo-chromosome 4. Our findings verify the utility of an ultra-dense genetic map for mapping a gene of interest, and for identifying new disease resistant genes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

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