Affordable Access

[Requests for abortion refused by the psychiatrist in the opinion of 218 involved women].

Authors
  • Wanner, O
Type
Published Article
Journal
Schweizerische medizinische Wochenschrift
Publication Date
Feb 16, 1974
Volume
104
Issue
7
Pages
242–249
Identifiers
PMID: 4814675
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Of 637 women in Switzerland who applied for abortion from 1953-1973, 317 were refused abortion. A study is presented showing the attitude of 218 of these women (a total of 221 pregnancies) concerning the decision after the pregnancy was otherwise terminated or completed. 160 of the 218 women were married, 43 were single, 10 were divorced, and 5 were widows. 88 of the pregnancies ended in abortion; 44 were spontaneous, 38 were terminated legally somewhere else, and 6 were admittedly induced illegally (considered to be too few by the author). 133 of the pregnancies ended in childbirth; to the 131 known cases, 110 of the babies were raised by the mother, 16 were raised by others or put up for adoption, and 5 died. Of the 133 pregnancies that ended in childbirth, 59.4% of the mothers felt that the refusal had been completely justified, 24.8% were ambivalent, and 15.8% felt that the refusal had been unjustified. Of the 88 pregnancies that ended in abortion, 15.9% felt that the refusal had been completely justified, 10.2% were ambivalent, 69.3% felt that the refusal had been unjustified, and 4.6% could make no judgment. The completely opposite responses by women who bore their children and those who underwent abortion seems to indicate that the patient adjusted psychically to the situation she found herself in. The change of abortion laws in Switzerland to add eugenic, legal-ethical, or sociomedical indications to the present medical indication is thus complicated; the ability of a woman or a doctor to decide whether the woman could undergo childbirth in accordance with such indications is difficult.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times