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Relocation of Early Instrumental Earthquakes in the Arctic

Authors
  • Morozov, A. N.1
  • Vaganova, N. V.2
  • Asming, V. E.3
  • Kremenetskaya, E. O.3
  • 1 Schmidt Institute of Physics of the Earth, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow, 123242, Russia , Moscow (Russia)
  • 2 Laverov Federal Center for Integrated Arctic Research, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Arkhangelsk, 163000, Russia , Arkhangelsk (Russia)
  • 3 Kola Branch of the Geophysical Survey, Russian Academy of Sciences, Apatity, 184200, Russia , Apatity (Russia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Seismic Instruments
Publisher
Pleiades Publishing
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2022
Volume
58
Issue
1
Pages
32–44
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3103/S0747923922010066
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Article
License
Yellow

Abstract

AbstractThe source parameters of earthquakes in the Arctic during the entire instrumental period were calculated using a small number of stations, which in addition were remote from each other. Furthermore, during the 20th century, the source parameters of Arctic earthquakes were most often calculated from bulletin data from only part of the seismic stations operating at that time, using outdated velocity models and localization algorithms. The present article describes an approach that has already been successfully used by the authors to refine the source parameters of early instrumental earthquakes in the Arctic. The approach uses all currently available archives of bulletins and seismograms from the seismic stations that operated in the early 20th century; it also employs the modern ak135 velocity model and an improved localization algorithm implemented in the NAS program. We have relocated the epicenters of earthquakes recorded within the Arctic in the early 20th century and compiled an updated catalog of relocated seismic events. The relocation procedure was applied to 18 out of 25 earthquakes in the Arctic. The new coordinates of some earthquakes appeared to significantly differ from the previously determined ones. As a result, this may significantly affect the ultimate seismic hazard assessment of such areas as Severnaya Zemlya and Franz Josef Land, which are characterized by weak seismicity. Most of the relocated earthquake epicenters are confined to the main seismically active zones of the Arctic, namely, mid-ocean ridges, the Svalbard archipelago, and the Laptev Sea shelf.

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