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Religion, Culture and Meaning-Making Coping: A Study Among Cancer Patients in Malaysia.

Authors
  • Ahmadi, Fereshteh1
  • Mohamed Hussin, Nur Atikah2
  • Mohammad, Mohd Taufik2
  • 1 Department of Social Work and Psychology, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, 801 76, Gävle, Sweden. [email protected] , (Sweden)
  • 2 Social Work Section, School of Social Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. , (Malaysia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Religion and Health
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2019
Volume
58
Issue
6
Pages
1909–1924
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10943-018-0636-9
PMID: 29948793
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The present study aimed to explore the use of meaning-making coping mechanisms (existential, spiritual and religious coping) among ethnic Malay cancer patients in Malaysia and to investigate the impact of culture on their choice of coping methods. Twenty-nine participants with various kinds of cancer were interviewed. Four kinds of coping resources emerged from analyses of the interview transcripts: (1) relying on transcendent power, (2) supernatural or mystical beliefs, (3) finding oneself in relationships with others and (4) nature. In this article, the two first resources are in focus. The present findings suggest that Malay culture, which is imbued with Islamic belief, strongly influences cancer patients' coping methods and ways of looking at their experience of being cancer patients.

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