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The relationship between stressors of temporary work and counterproductive work behaviour.

Authors
  • Striler, Jamie1
  • Shoss, Mindy1
  • Jex, Steve1
  • 1 Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Stress and health : journal of the International Society for the Investigation of Stress
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
37
Issue
2
Pages
329–340
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/smi.2998
PMID: 33067877
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Recent research on temporary work has suggested that temporary work experiences vary greatly in quality. In light of concerns about diminished quality of some temporary work experiences, we suggest that temporary workers may experience a variety of stressful work situations that could precipitate detrimental outcomes not only for these workers, but also for their co-workers and organizations. Using a multi-wave survey of temporary workers, this study examines the relationship between economic, interpersonal, and organizational stressors and counterproductive work behaviour (CWB). Specifically, we hypothesize that economic stressors (operationalized as economic hardship and job insecurity), interpersonal conflict and organizational constraints will predict the extent to which temporary workers perform CWB via emotional exhaustion and moral disengagement pathways. Three waves of data show that temporary workers experiencing higher levels of economic hardship, interpersonal conflict and organizational constraints reported greater emotional exhaustion, which was linked to increased frequency of CWBs. Additionally, higher levels of job insecurity and interpersonal conflict were related to higher levels of moral disengagement, which related to increased frequency of CWBs. These findings highlight relationships of different stressors with emotional and cognitive reactions that may trigger CWB in temporary workers. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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