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Relationship between self-stigma about alcohol dependence and severity of alcohol drinking and craving.

Authors
  • Crozier, Madeline E1
  • Farokhnia, Mehdi1, 2
  • Persky, Susan3
  • Leggio, Lorenzo1, 4, 5, 6
  • Curtis, Brenda7
  • 1 Translational Addiction Medicine Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse Intramural Research Program, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
  • 2 Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
  • 3 Social and Behavioral Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute Division of Intramural Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
  • 4 Division of Addiction Medicine, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
  • 5 Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, New England, USA.
  • 6 Department of Neuroscience, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
  • 7 Translational Addiction Medicine Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse Intramural Research Program, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA [email protected].
Type
Published Article
Journal
BMJ mental health
Publication Date
Nov 22, 2023
Volume
26
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1136/bmjment-2023-300852
PMID: 37993282
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The correlates and consequences of stigma surrounding alcohol use are complex. Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is typically accompanied by self-stigma, due to numerous factors, such as shame, guilt and negative stereotypes. Few studies have empirically examined the possible association between self-stigma and alcohol-related outcomes. To investigate the relationship between self-stigma about alcohol dependence and the severity of alcohol consumption and craving. In a sample of 64 participants, the majority of whom had a diagnosis of AUD (51), bivariate correlations were first conducted between Self-Stigma and Alcohol Dependence Scale (SSAD-Apply subscale) scores and Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scores, Alcohol Timeline Follow-Back, Obsessive-Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS) scores and Penn Alcohol Cravings Scale scores. Based on the results, regression analyses were conducted with SSAD scores as the predictor and AUDIT and OCDS scores as the outcomes. SSAD scores positively correlated with AUDIT scores, average drinks per drinking day, number of heavy drinking days and OCDS scores (p<0.001, p=0.014, p=0.011 and p<0.001, respectively). SSAD scores were also found to be a significant predictor of AUDIT and OCDS scores (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively), even after controlling for demographics. Higher levels of self-stigma were associated with more severe AUD, greater alcohol consumption, and more obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviours related to alcohol. Our results suggest that potential interventions to reduce self-stigma may lead to improved quality of life and treatment outcomes for individuals with AUD. © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2023. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. Published by BMJ.

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