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Relationship between religiosity and smoking among undergraduate health sciences students.

Authors
  • Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi1
  • Bueno-Silva, Carolina Cunha1
  • Bartolomeu, Isabela Mirandola1
  • Ribeiro-Pizzo, Livia Borges1
  • Zucoloto, Miriane Lucindo1
  • 1 Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo (FMRP-USP), Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. , (Brazil)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Trends in psychiatry and psychotherapy
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2021
Volume
43
Issue
1
Pages
17–22
Identifiers
DOI: 10.47626/2237-6089-2019-0031
PMID: 33681901
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The university period is often characterized as a critical period of vulnerability for smoking habit initiation. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess the relationship between religiosity and smoking among undergraduate students on health sciences courses. A total of 336 students on four health sciences courses (occupational therapy, speech therapy, nutrition, and physiotherapy) completed a cigarette smoking questionnaire along with the Duke University Religion Index. Smoking prevalence was 8.3% among females and 12.7% among males. Prevalence among students who do not have a religion, but do believe in God, was higher than among those who do have a religion (16.3 and 6.3%, respectively). Organizational religious activity has a significant effect on smoking status. The students have health habits that are not only motivated by the technical knowledge acquired on their undergraduate courses, since there was a possible influence of social norms stimulated by religious institutions on their attitudes, knowledge and practices in health.

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