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On the relationship between long-distance and heterogeneous electron transfer in electrode-grown Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms.

Authors
  • Yates, Matthew D1
  • Eddie, Brian J2
  • Lebedev, Nikolai2
  • Kotloski, Nicholas J3
  • Strycharz-Glaven, Sarah M2
  • Tender, Leonard M4
  • 1 Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, USA.
  • 3 Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, USA; George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, USA.
  • 4 Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Bioelectrochemistry (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2018
Volume
119
Pages
111–118
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.bioelechem.2017.09.007
PMID: 28963994
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The ability of certain microorganisms to live in a multi-cell thick, electrode-grown biofilm by utilizing the electrode as a metabolic electron acceptor or donor requires electron transfer across cell membranes, through the biofilm, and across the biofilm/electrode interface. Even for the most studied system, anode-grown Geobacter sulfurreducens, the mechanisms underpinning each process and how they connect is largely unresolved. Here we report on G. sulfurreducens biofilms grown across the gap separating two electrodes by maintaining one electrode at 0.300V vs. Ag/AgCl (0.510V vs. SHE) to act as a sustained metabolic electron acceptor while the second electrode was at open circuit. The poised electrode exhibited the characteristic current-time profile for electrode-dependent G. sulfurreducens biofilm growth. The open circuit potential (OCP) of the second electrode however increased after initially decreasing for 1.5-2days. The increase in OCP is taken to indicate the point at which the growing biofilm bridged the gap between the electrodes, enabling cells in contact with the open circuit electrode to utilize the poised electrode as an electron acceptor. After but not prior to reaching this point, the second electrode was able to act as a sustainable electron acceptor immediately after being placed under potential control without requiring further time to develop. These results indicate that heterogeneous ET (H-ET) across the biofilm/electrode interface and long-distance ET (LD-ET) through the biofilm are highly correlated, if not inseparable, and may share many common components.

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