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The relationship between dysfunctional metacognitive beliefs and problematic social networking sites use.

Authors
  • Balıkçı, Kuzeymen1
  • Aydın, Orkun2
  • Sönmez, İpek1
  • Kalo, Bengü2
  • Ünal-Aydın, Pınar2
  • 1 Department of Psychiatry, Near East University Faculty of Medicine, Nicosia, Republic of Northern Cyprus. , (Cyprus)
  • 2 Department of Psychology, International University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. , (Bosnia & Herzegovina)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Scandinavian Journal of Psychology
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
61
Issue
5
Pages
593–598
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/sjop.12634
PMID: 32145032
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Social networking sites (SNSs) enrol new subscribers each day. However, problematic SNS use has undesirable effects on psychological functioning. Therefore, it is important to identify the factors that contribute to the development of problematic SNS use. Very few studies have focused on revealing the underlying mechanisms of problematic SNS use. Although many past studies have examined the relationship between metacognitive beliefs and Internet addiction, the association between metacognitive beliefs and problematic SNS use has not been adequately explored. In this study, we aimed to explore the association between metacognitive beliefs and problematic SNS use among young adults. A total of 308 individuals participated in this study. A socio-demographic data form, the Metacognitions Questionnaire-30 (MCQ-30), and Social Media Addiction Scale (SMAS) were administered. Group comparisons were performed using multivariate analysis of covariance. Pearson's correlational and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations between metacognitive beliefs and problematic SNS use. The SNS addicts scored higher in all of the SMAS assessments. When compared to non-addicts, SNS addicts obtained higher scores on all the subtests of the SMAS and MCQ-30 except cognitive self-consciousness. The negative beliefs about the uncontrollability and danger of worry, cognitive confidence, and need for control thoughts were associated with SMAS mood modification, relapse and conflict subdimensions. Our findings revealed that dysfunctional metacognitive beliefs are related to problematic SNS use among young adults. These findings indicate that mental health workers should consider the modification of metacognitive beliefs in the treatment of problematic SNS use. © 2020 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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