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The relation between measures of explicit shame and borderline personality features in adolescent inpatients.

Authors
  • Wall, K1
  • Kerr, S1
  • Nguyen, M1
  • Sharp, C2
  • 1 University of Houston, Department of Psychology, 3695 Cullen Blvd, Room 126, Houston, TX, United States. , (United States)
  • 2 University of Houston, Department of Psychology, 3695 Cullen Blvd, Room 126, Houston, TX, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of affective disorders
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2021
Volume
282
Pages
458–464
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2020.12.152
PMID: 33422823
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Shame is a highly negative emotion frequently experienced by individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) as well as those with internalizing or externalizing psychopathology. However, few studies have examined whether shame is related to BPD above and beyond other psychopathology. Further, although feelings of shame peak during adolescence, coinciding with the onset of BPD, very few studies have examined the relationship between shame and BPD in adolescence. Therefore, the current study examined (1) whether levels of shame differ between adolescent psychiatric inpatients with and without BPD and (2) whether borderline personality pathology accounts for additional variance in the experience of shame above and beyond internalizing and externalizing psychopathology. Adolescent psychiatric inpatients (n = 184, 67% female, M age = 15.26) completed clinical interviews and self-report measures as well as self-report measures of three types of explicit shame: state-shame, shame-proneness, and trait-shame. T-tests revealed that adolescents with BPD reported significantly higher levels of each type of explicit shame. In hierarchical regression models, borderline personality features explained significant additional variance in shame-proneness and trait-shame while controlling for age, gender, and internalizing and externalizing psychopathology. Our sample was limited by a lack of demographic diversity and healthy control group, and the study did not examine relations with unique internalizing/externalizing disorders or features of BPD. Our findings contribute to growing evidence that shame is an important component of BPD, particularly during adolescence, and suggest that shame should be addressed in treatment. Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier B.V.

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