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Relating oral physiology and anatomy of consumers varying in age, gender and ethnicity to food oral processing behavior.

Authors
  • Ketel, Eva C1
  • de Wijk, Rene A2
  • de Graaf, Cees3
  • Stieger, Markus4
  • 1 TiFN, P.O. Box 557, AN Wageningen 6700, the Netherlands; Division of Human Nutrition and Health, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Netherlands)
  • 2 TiFN, P.O. Box 557, AN Wageningen 6700, the Netherlands; Food and Biobased Research, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 3 Division of Human Nutrition and Health, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 4 TiFN, P.O. Box 557, AN Wageningen 6700, the Netherlands; Division of Human Nutrition and Health, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Physiology & behavior
Publication Date
Dec 05, 2019
Volume
215
Pages
112766–112766
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2019.112766
PMID: 31812520
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The aim of this study was to link parameters describing oral physiology and anatomy of consumers varying in age, gender and ethnicity to food oral processing behavior. Three groups of healthy consumers were compared: Dutch, Caucasian adults (18-30 yrs, n =32), Chinese, Asian adults (18-30 yrs, n =32) and Dutch, Caucasian older adults (65-85 yrs, n =32). Mastication performance, salivary flow rate (stimulated and unstimulated) and dental status were quantified to characterize oral physiology. Volume of oral cavity, tongue dimensions, facial anthropometry, height and weight were quantified to characterize anatomy. Oral processing behavior of three solid foods (carrot, cheese and sausage) was quantified by video recordings and eating rate (g/s), average consumption time (s), chews per bite (-) and average bite size (g) were determined. Dutch, Caucasian older adults had smaller volume of oral cavity, lower number of teeth and larger head width compared to Dutch, Caucasian adults. Chinese, Asian adults showed significantly higher mastication performance and larger head width compared to Dutch, Caucasian consumers, while dental status did not significantly differ between groups. Males had significantly larger volumes of oral cavity and larger head height and width compared to females. Dutch, Caucasian adults had a shorter average consumption time (s), less chews per bite and consumed the three foods with higher eating rate (g/s) compared to Dutch, Caucasian older adults. Chinese, Asian adults had a significantly longer average consumption time (s), more chews per bite, smaller average bite size (g) and lower eating rate (g/s) compared to Dutch, Caucasian adults. Twenty-one significant relationships were found between oral physiological and anatomical parameters and oral processing behavior. Body weight resulted in the largest β-values, indicating to be the anatomical parameter of largest influence on oral processing behavior. We conclude that only few oral physiological and anatomical parameters related with food oral processing behavior. We suggest that other factors, including cultural factors contribute to variation in food oral processing behavior between different consumer groups more than saliva flow, volume of oral cavity, mastication performance and dental status. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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