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Reinfection after successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori in three different populations in Alaska.

Authors
  • Bruce, M G
  • Bruden, D L
  • Morris, J M
  • Reasonover, A L
  • Sacco, F
  • Hurlburt, D
  • Hennessy, T W
  • Gove, J
  • Parkinson, A
  • Sahagun, G
  • Davis, P
  • Klejka, J
  • McMahon, B J
Type
Published Article
Journal
Epidemiology and Infection
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2015
Volume
143
Issue
6
Pages
1236–1246
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1017/S0950268814001770
PMID: 25068917
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

We performed a study to determine rates of reinfection in three groups followed for 2 years after successful treatment: American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) persons living in urban (group 1) and rural (group 2) communities, and urban Alaska non-Native persons (group 3). We enrolled adults diagnosed with H. pylori infection based on a positive urea breath test (13C-UBT). After successful treatment was documented at 2 months, we tested each patient by 13C-UBT at 4, 6, 12 and 24 months. At each visit, participants were asked about medication use, illnesses and risk factors for reinfection. We followed 229 persons for 2 years or until they became reinfected. H. pylori reinfection occurred in 36 persons; cumulative reinfection rates were 14·5%, 22·1%, and 12·0% for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Study participants who became reinfected were more likely to have peptic ulcer disease (P = 0·02), low education level (P = 0·04), or have a higher proportion of household members infected with H. pylori compared to participants who did not become reinfected (P = 0·03). Among all three groups, reinfection occurred at rates higher than those reported for other US populations (<5% at 2 years); rural AI/AN individuals appear to be at highest risk for reinfection.

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