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Regulation of cell cycle by the anaphase spindle midzone

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BioMed Central
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PMC
Keywords
  • Research Article
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Medicine

Abstract

1471-2121-5-49.fm ral ss BioMed CentBMC Cell Biology Open AcceResearch article Regulation of cell cycle by the anaphase spindle midzone Maki Murata-Hori*1,2, Greenfield Sluder3 and Yu-li Wang1 Address: 1Department of Physiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 377 Plantation St., Worcester, Massachusetts, 01605, USA, 2Mammalian Cell Biology Group, Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory, 1 Research Link, National University of Singapore, 117604, Singapore and 3Department of Cell Biology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 377 Plantation St., Worcester, Massachusetts, 01605, USA Email: Maki Murata-Hori* - [email protected]; Greenfield Sluder - [email protected]; Yu-li Wang - [email protected] * Corresponding author Abstract Background: A number of proteins accumulate in the spindle midzone and midbody of dividing animal cells. Besides proteins essential for cytokinesis, there are also components essential for interphase functions, suggesting that the spindle midzone and/or midbody may play a role in regulating the following cell cycle. Results: We microsurgically severed NRK epithelial cells during anaphase or telophase, such that the spindle midzone/midbody was associated with only one of the daughter cells. Time-lapse recording of cells severed during early anaphase indicated that the cell with midzone underwent cytokinesis-like cortical contractions and progressed normally through the interphase, whereas the cell without midzone showed no cortical contraction and an arrest or substantial delay in the progression of interphase. Similar microsurgery during telophase showed a normal progression of interphase for both daughter cells with or without the midbody. Microsurgery of anaphase cells treated with cytochalasin D or nocodazole indicated that interphase progression was independent of cortical ingression but dependent on microtubules. Conclusions: We conclude that the mitotic spindle is involved in not only the separation of chromos

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