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Regular Wounding in a Natural System: Bacteria Associated With Reproductive Organs of Bedbugs and Their Quorum Sensing Abilities

Authors
  • Otti, Oliver1, 2
  • Deines, Peter1, 3
  • Hammerschmidt, Katrin1, 4
  • Reinhardt, Klaus1, 5
  • 1 Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield , (United Kingdom)
  • 2 Animal Population Ecology, Animal Ecology I, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth , (Germany)
  • 3 Zoological Institute, Christian Albrechts University Kiel, Kiel , (Germany)
  • 4 Institute of Microbiology, Christian Albrechts University Kiel, Kiel , (Germany)
  • 5 Applied Zoology, Department of Biology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers in Immunology
Publisher
Frontiers Media SA
Publication Date
Dec 18, 2017
Volume
8
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/fimmu.2017.01855
Source
Frontiers
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Immunology
  • Original Research
License
Green

Abstract

During wounding, tissues are disrupted so that bacteria can easily enter the host and trigger a host response. Both the host response and bacterial communication can occur through quorum sensing (QS) and quorum sensing inhibition (QSI). Here, we characterize the effect of wounding on the host-associated bacterial community of the bed bug. This is a model system where the male is wounding the female during every mating. Whereas several aspects of the microbial involvement during wounding have been previously examined, it is not clear to what extent QS and QSI play a role. We find that the microbiome differs depending on mating and feeding status of female bedbugs and is specific to the location of isolation. Most organs of bedbugs harbor bacteria, which are capable of both QS and QSI signaling. By focusing on the prokaryotic quorum communication system, we provide a baseline for future research in this unique system. We advocate the bedbug system as suitable for studying the effects of bacteria on reproduction and for addressing prokaryote and eukaryote communication during wounding.

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