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Regular group exercise is associated with improved mood but not quality of life following stroke.

Authors
  • McDonnell, Michelle N
  • Mackintosh, Shylie F
  • Hillier, Susan L
  • Bryan, Janet
Type
Published Article
Journal
PeerJ
Publisher
PeerJ
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2014
Volume
2
Identifiers
DOI: 10.7717/peerj.331
PMID: 24749010
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Purpose. People with stroke living in the community have an increased prevalence of depression and lower quality of life than healthy older adults. This cross-sectional observational study investigated whether participation in regular exercise was associated with improved mood and quality of life. Methods. We recruited three groups of community dwelling participants: 13 healthy older adults, 17 adults post-stroke who regularly participated in group exercise at a community fitness facility and 10 adults post-stroke who did not regularly exercise. We measured mood using the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS) and quality of life using the Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL) scale. Results. Levels of stress and depression were significantly greater in the people with stroke who did not undertake regular exercise (p = 0.004 and p = 0.004 respectively), although this group had more recent strokes (p < 0.001). Both stroke groups had lower quality of life scores (p = 0.04) than the healthy adults. Conclusions. This small, community-based study confirms that people following stroke report poorer quality of life than stroke-free individuals. However, those who exercise regularly have significantly lower stress and depression compared to stroke survivors who do not. Future research should focus on the precise type and amount of exercise capable of improving mood following stroke.

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