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Regional brain activity of free radical defense enzymes in autopsy samples from patients with Alzheimer's disease and from nondemented controls.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
The International journal of neuroscience
Publication Date
Volume
75
Issue
1-2
Pages
83–90
Identifiers
PMID: 8050854
Source
Medline

Abstract

Several lines of evidence support the hypothesis that oxygen free radicals are involved in the destruction of neurons in various degenerative disorders of the central nervous system. The activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, three enzymes that contribute to the cellular defenses against free radical damage, were measured in different areas of autopsy brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease and from age matched controls. All brains were removed within 24 hours of the time of death and were cut in half sagitally. One half was stored frozen at -86 degrees C and the other half was examined histologically to confirm the presence or absence of Alzheimer's disease. Samples were taken from the frozen half for the enzyme assays. In control brains, the activity of superoxide dismutase is significantly higher in the cerebellum, frontal cortex and hippocampus than it is in the temporal cortex, parietal cortex and entorhinal cortex. The activity of catalase is significantly higher in cerebellum and frontal cortex than in hippocampus, parietal cortex and entorhinal cortex. Glutathione peroxidase activity is uniform across all brain areas studied. In Alzheimer's brains, superoxide dismutase activity is not statistically different among the various brain regions studied, but it is significantly lower than control in the cerebellum (-27%), frontal cortex (-27%) and hippocampus (-35%). Catalase is significantly higher in Alzheimer's cerebellum, frontal cortex and temporal cortex than in Alzheimer's hippocampus, parietal cortex and entorhinal cortex. However, there are no significant differences in catalase activity between Alzheimer's and control samples.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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