Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Regional Anesthesia for Ambulatory Anesthesiologists.

Authors
  • Ardon, Alberto E1
  • Prasad, Arun2
  • McClain, Robert Lewis3
  • Melton, M Stephen4
  • Nielsen, Karen C4
  • Greengrass, Roy3
  • 1 Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida Jacksonville, 655 West 8th Street, Jacksonville, FL 32209, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Anesthesiology, University of Toronto, Women's College Hospital, Mc L 2-405, 399, Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 3 Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA.
  • 4 Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University Medical Center, DUMC Box #3094, Stop #4, Durham, NC 27710, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Anesthesiology clinics
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2019
Volume
37
Issue
2
Pages
265–287
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.anclin.2019.01.005
PMID: 31047129
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Proper pain control is critical for ambulatory surgery. Regional anesthesia can decrease postoperative pain, improve patient satisfaction, and expedite patient discharge. This article discusses the techniques, clinical pearls, and potential pitfalls associated with those blocks, which are most useful in an ambulatory perioperative setting. Interscalene, supraclavicular, infraclavicular, axillary, paravertebral, erector spinae, pectoralis, serratus anterior, transversus abdominis plane, femoral, adductor canal, popliteal, interspace between the popliteal artery and capsule of the knee, and ankle blocks are described. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times