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Reduction of all-trans-retinal limits regeneration of visual pigment in mice.

Authors
  • 1
Type
Published Article
Journal
Vision Research
0042-6989
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
38
Issue
10
Pages
1325–1333
Identifiers
PMID: 9667000
Source
Medline

Abstract

Absorption of photons by pigments in photoreceptor cells results in photoisomerization of the chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, to all-trans-retinal and activation of opsin. Photolysed chromophore is converted back to the 11-cis-configuration via several enzymatic steps in photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelial cells. We investigated the levels of retinoids in mouse retina during constant illumination and regeneration in the dark as a means of obtaining more information about the rate-limiting step of the visual cycle and about cycle intermediates that could be responsible for desensitization of the visual system. All-trans-retinal accumulated in the retinas during constant illumination and following flash illumination. Decay of all-trans-retinal in the dark following constant illumination occurred without substantial accumulation of all-trans-retinal, generated by constant approximately equal to visual pigment regeneration (t1/2 approximately 5 and t1/2 approximately 7 min, respectively). All-trans-retinal, generated by constant illumination, decayed approximately 3 times more rapidly than that generated by a flash and, as shown previously, the rate of rhodopsin regeneration following a flash was approximately 4 times slower than after constant illumination. The retinyl ester pool (> 95% all-trans-retinyl ester) did not show a statistically significant change in size or composition during illumination. In addition, constant illumination increased the amount of photoreceptor membrane-associated arrestin. The results suggest that the rate-limiting step of the visual cycle is the reduction of all-trans-retinal to all-trans-retinol by all-trans-retinol dehydrogenase. The accumulation of all-trans-retinal during illumination may be responsible, in part, for the reduction in sensitivity of the visual system that accompanies photobleaching and may contribute to the development of retinal pathology associated with light damage and aging.

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