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Reduced transglutaminase-catalyzed protein aggregation is observed in the presence of creatine using sedimentation velocity.

Authors
  • Burguera, Elena F
  • Love, Brian J
Type
Published Article
Journal
Analytical biochemistry
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2006
Volume
350
Issue
1
Pages
113–119
Identifiers
PMID: 16445883
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Transglutaminases (TGases) are enzymes that catalyze covalent isopeptide crosslinks between reactive lysine and glutamine residues in proteins. Higher than normal local concentrations of TGase have been correlated with increased protein aggregation in vivo. These insoluble protein aggregates are the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases, although each aggregating protein involved is disease specific. Because TGase is implicated in protein aggregation, there is evidence that its regulation may retard disease progression. Here we report on a laser light transmission technique as an in vitro tool to gauge the efficacy of creatine, a candidate inhibitor, to regulate aggregation. Sedimentation velocities of protein-coated particles in TGase-containing water-glycerol solutions were tracked with different levels of creatine. Sedimentation velocities were converted to apparent aggregate sizes using Stoke's law of sedimentation. The results indicated that creatine promoted up to a 20% reduction in protein aggregation in vitro. This technique may prove to be useful in identifying other functional TGase inhibitors.

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