Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Red meat consumption and metabolic syndrome in the Costa Rica Heart Study.

Authors
  • Luan, D1
  • Wang, D1
  • Campos, H2, 3
  • Baylin, A4, 5
  • 1 Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.
  • 2 Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.
  • 3 Centro de Investigación e Innovación en Nutrición Traslacional y Salud, Universidad Hispanoamericana, San Jose, Costa Rica. , (Costa Rica)
  • 4 Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA. [email protected]
  • 5 Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2029, USA. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
European Journal of Nutrition
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2020
Volume
59
Issue
1
Pages
185–193
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00394-019-01898-6
PMID: 30649594
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Several epidemiologic investigations have found associations between the consumption of red meat and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Very few studies have looked at populations undergoing the nutrition transition with smaller levels of red meat consumption than those in Westernized countries. In this population-based cross-sectional study, we examined the association between red meat consumption and MetS in Costa Rican adults, a population with comparably lower consumption of red meat. Prevalence ratios (PRs) of MetS across quintiles of total, unprocessed, and processed red meat consumption were estimated with log-binomial regression models among 2058 adults from the Costa Rican Heart Study. Least-squares mean values of individual components of MetS across quintiles of red meat consumption were estimated with linear regression models. We observed a significant positive association between total red meat consumption and MetS (PR for highest compared to lowest quintile: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.42; P for trend = 0.0113) but not for unprocessed or processed red meat consumption when analyzed separately after mutual adjustments. We additionally observed a significant positive association between total, unprocessed, and processed red meat consumption and abdominal obesity. In this Hispanic population undergoing the nutrition transition, total red meat intake may have an impact on MetS. Based on the relatively low consumption of red meat in Costa Rica compared to other Westernized countries, we hypothesize that a "threshold effect" may exist for unprocessed and processed red meat.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times