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Recurrent torticollis secondary to Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a case report.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Acta orthopaedica Belgica
Publication Date
Volume
71
Issue
1
Pages
102–106
Identifiers
PMID: 15792216
Source
Medline

Abstract

Torticollis is a common clinical sign encountered by pediatricians and orthopaedic surgeons in a wide spectrum of childhood conditions ranging from benign to life-threatening. We report the case of a child with recurrent torticollis caused by Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH). The patient was a 1-year-old boy with recurrent torticollis, followed by a painless swelling over the right temporal bone. The diagnosis was confirmed by an open biopsy of the calvarial lesion. As LCH is a very rare cause of torticollis it was not considered in the initial differential by the primary care physicians and the diagnosis was delayed about 4 months. The patient received chemotherapy with steroids and etoposide for 52 weeks. He showed complete regression of the sign and imaging tests at the end of treatment were normal. No relapse of symptoms occurred during a follow-up period of 2 years. The rarity of this disease as well as the site and form of presentation are emphasised to alert physicians for an early diagnostic evaluation, which is important to prevent neurological lesions and other late complications.

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