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Rectal prolapse surgery in males and females: An ACS NSQIP-based comparative analysis of over 12,000 patients.

Authors
  • Vogel, Jon D1
  • de Campos-Lobato, Luiz Felipe2
  • Chapman, Brandon C3
  • Bronsert, Michael R4
  • Birnbaum, Elisa H5
  • Meguid, Robert A4
  • 1 Colorectal Surgery Section, Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Surgery, Federal University of Minas Gerais, School of Medicine, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 3 University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Chattanooga, TN, USA.
  • 4 Surgical Outcomes and Applied Research Program, Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA; Adult and Child Center for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA.
  • 5 Colorectal Surgery Section, Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
American journal of surgery
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2020
Volume
220
Issue
3
Pages
697–705
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2020.01.017
PMID: 31987495
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Rectal prolapse is relatively uncommon in male patients. The aim of this study was to compare males and females who underwent rectal prolapse surgery. Retrospective analysis of the ACS NSQIP public use file. Among 12,220 patients, 978 (8%) were male and 11,242 (92%) were female. Males were younger, 56 (38-73) vs. 71 (58-83) years, less often white (83% vs. 71%), had lower ASA scores, and underwent more laparoscopic (33% vs. 27%), more open (33% vs. 29%), and less perineal (33% vs 44%) procedures (all p < 0.05). Morbidity (9.9% vs. 10.0%), reoperation (3.4% vs. 3.1%), and readmission (5.7% vs. 6.0%) were not different for males and females. In subgroup analysis by surgical procedure type, there remained no outcome differences. Propensity matched analysis revealed no difference in the use of laparoscopic, open, or perineal procedures. Males with rectal prolapse are younger, have a different racial distribution, a lower surgical risk profile, and undergo different surgical procedures than females, which appears to be driven by patient age and surgical risk assessment. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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