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Recent update on lactic acid bacteria producing riboflavin and folates: application for food fortification and treatment of intestinal inflammation.

Authors
  • Levit, R1
  • Savoy de Giori, G1, 2
  • de Moreno de LeBlanc, A1
  • LeBlanc, J G1
  • 1 Centro de Referencia para Lactobacilos (CERELA-CONICET), San Miguel de Tucumán, Tucumán, Argentina. , (Argentina)
  • 2 Cátedra de Microbiología Superior, Facultad de Bioquímica, Química y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán, Tucumán, Argentina. , (Argentina)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Applied Microbiology
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
May 01, 2021
Volume
130
Issue
5
Pages
1412–1424
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/jam.14854
PMID: 32955761
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), widely used as starter cultures for the fermentation of a large variety of food, can improve the safety, shelf life, nutritional value and overall quality of the fermented products. In this regard, the selection of strains delivering health-promoting compounds is now the main objective of many researchers. Although most LAB are auxotrophic for several vitamins, it is known that certain strains have the capability to synthesize B-group vitamins. This is an important property since humans cannot synthesize most vitamins, and these could be obtained by consuming LAB fermented foods. This review discusses the use of LAB as an alternative to fortification by the chemical synthesis to increase riboflavin and folate concentrations in food. Moreover, it provides an overview of the recent applications of vitamin-producing LAB with anti-inflammatory/antioxidant activities against gastrointestinal tract inflammation. This review shows the potential uses of riboflavin and folates producing LAB for the biofortification of food, as therapeutics against intestinal pathologies and to complement anti-inflammatory/anti-neoplastic treatments. © 2020 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

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