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Recent advances on mycotic keratitis caused by dematiaceous hyphomycetes.

Authors
  • Rai, M1
  • Ingle, A P2
  • Ingle, P1
  • Gupta, I1
  • Mobin, M3
  • Bonifaz, A4
  • Alves, M5
  • 1 Department of Biotechnology, Sant Gadge Baba Amravati University, Amravati, Maharashtra, India. , (India)
  • 2 Department of Biotechnology, Engineering School of Lorena, University of Sao Paulo, Lorena, SP, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 3 Research Laboratory, University Center UNINOVAFAPI, Teresina, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 4 Department of Mycology & Dermatology Service, General Hospital of Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico. , (Mexico)
  • 5 Department of Ophthalmology, University of Campinas, Campinas, SP, Brazil. , (Brazil)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Applied Microbiology
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2021
Volume
131
Issue
4
Pages
1652–1667
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/jam.15008
PMID: 33462841
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Dematiaceous hyphomycetes (DH) are darkly pigmented fungi ubiquitously found all over the world as plant pathogens and saprophytes, and many of the members of this group have emerged as opportunistic pathogens. These fungi are responsible for a wide variety of infections including mycotic keratitis, which is considered as one of the major causes of corneal blindness, particularly in tropical and subtropical countries with an annual global burden of about 1 000 000 patients. The infection is more common in workers working in an outdoor environment. Moreover, trauma is found to be the most important predisposing cause of mycotic keratitis. Considerable delay in diagnosis and scarcity of effective pharmacological drugs are the major factors responsible for increased morbidity and visual impairment. Considering the crucial role of DH in mycotic keratitis, in the present review, we have focused on major DH with special emphasis on their pathogenicity, diagnosis and treatment strategies. © 2021 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

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