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Reasons for Increased Caesarean Section Rate in Vietnam: A Qualitative Study among Vietnamese Mothers and Health Care Professionals

Authors
  • Takegata, Mizuki1
  • Smith, Chris2, 3
  • Nguyen, Hien Anh Thi4
  • Thi, Hai Huynh5
  • Thi Minh, Trang Nguyen5
  • Day, Louise Tina2
  • Kitamura, Toshinori6
  • Toizumi, Michiko1
  • Dang, Duc Anh4
  • Yoshida, Lay-Myint1
  • 1 (L.-M.Y.)
  • 2 (L.T.D.)
  • 3 Graduate School of Tropical Medicine & Global Health, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523, Japan
  • 4 (D.A.D.)
  • 5 (T.N.T.M.)
  • 6 Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Nagoya 4668550, Japan
Type
Published Article
Journal
Healthcare
Publisher
MDPI
Publication Date
Feb 21, 2020
Volume
8
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/healthcare8010041
PMID: 32098136
PMCID: PMC7151040
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Article
License
Green

Abstract

The Caesarean section rate in urban Vietnam is 43% in 2014, which is more than twice the recommended rate (10%–15%) by the World Health Organization. This qualitative study aims to identify the perceptions of pregnant mothers and health care professionals on the medical and social factors related to the increased Caesarean section rate in Vietnam. A qualitative descriptive study was conducted among pregnant mothers and healthcare professionals at two public hospitals in Nha Trang city. A content analysis was adopted in order to identify social and medical factors. As a result, 29 pregnant women and 19 health care professionals were invited to participate in the qualitative interviews. Private interviews were conducted with 10 women who wished to have a Caesarean section, and the others participated in focus group interviews. The main themes of the social factors were ‘request for Caesarean section,’ ‘mental strain of obstetricians,’ and ‘decision-making process.’ To conclude, this qualitative study suggests that there were unnecessary caesarean sections without a clear medical indication, which were requested by women and family members. Psychological fear occurred among women and family, and doctors were the main determinants for driving the requests for Caesarean section, which implies that education and emotional encouragement is necessary by midwives. In addition, a multi-faced approach including a mandatory reporting system in clinical fields and involving family members in antenatal education is important.

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