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The reactions of hydrogen peroxide with bovine cytochrome c oxidase.

Authors
  • Jünemann, S
  • Heathcote, P
  • Rich, P R
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jan 03, 2000
Volume
1456
Issue
1
Pages
56–66
Identifiers
PMID: 10611456
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Oxidised cytochrome c oxidase is known to react with two molecules of hydrogen peroxide to form consecutively 607 nm 'Peroxy' and 580-nm 'Ferryl' species. These are widely used as model compounds for the equivalent P and F intermediates of the catalytic cycle. However, kinetic analysis of the reaction with H(2)O(2) in the pH range 6.0-9.0 reveals a more complex situation. In particular, as the pH is lowered, a 580-nm compound can be formed by reaction with a single H(2)O(2). This species, termed F(&z.rad;), is spectrally similar, but not identical, to F. The reactions are equivalent to those previously reported for the bo type quinol oxidase from Escherichia coli (T. Brittain, R.H. Little, C. Greenwood, N.J. Watmough, FEBS Lett. 399 (1996) 21-25) where it was proposed that F(&z.rad;) is produced directly from P. However, in the bovine oxidase F(&z.rad;) does not appear in samples of the 607-nm form, P(M), produced by CO/O(2) treatment, even at low pH, although this form is shown to be identical to the H(2)O(2)-derived P state, P(H), on the basis of spectral characteristics and kinetics of reaction with H(2)O(2). Furthermore, lowering the pH of a sample of P(M) or P(H) generated at high pH results in F(&z.rad;) formation only on a minutes time scale. It is concluded that P and F(&z.rad;) are not in a rapid, pH-dependent equilibrium, but instead are formed by distinct pathways and cannot interconvert in a simple manner, and that the crucial difference between them lies in their patterns of protonation.

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