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Rapid and slow nitric oxide responses during conducted vasodilation in the in vivo intestine and brain cortex microvasculatures.

Authors
  • Bohlen, H Glenn1
  • 1 Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, Indiana University Medical School, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA. [email protected] , (India)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Microcirculation (New York, N.Y. : 1994)
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2011
Volume
18
Issue
8
Pages
623–634
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/j.1549-8719.2011.00127.x
PMID: 22098301
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Conduction of arteriolar vasodilation is initiated by activation of nitric oxide (NO) mechanisms, but dependent on conduction of hyperpolarization. Most studies have used brief (<1 second) activation of the initial vasodilation to evaluate the fast conduction processes. However, most arteriolar mechanisms involving NO production persist for minutes. In this study, fast and slower components of arteriolar conduction in the in vivo rat brain and small intestine were compared using three-minute stimulation of NO-dependent vasodilation and measurement of [NO] at the distal sites. Within 10-15 seconds, both vasculatures had a rapidly conducted vasodilation and dilation at distance had a fast but small [NO] component. A slower but larger distal vasodilation occurred after 60-90 seconds in the intestine, but not the brain, and was associated with a substantial increase in [NO]. This slowly developed dilation appeared to be caused by flow mediated responses of larger arterioles as smaller arterioles dilated to lower downstream resistance. These results indicate while the intestinal and cerebral arterioles have a fast conducted vasodilation system, the intestinal arterioles also have a slower but larger dilation of major arterioles that is NO related and dependent on the conduction of vasodilation between small arterioles.

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