Rapid assessment of injection practices in Cambodia, 2002

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Rapid assessment of injection practices in Cambodia, 2002

Publisher
BioMed Central
Publication Date
Source
PMC
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Medicine
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Unknown

Abstract

Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination Information for Diabetes Educators What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis B virus. When first infected, a person can develop an “acute” infection, which can range in severity from a very mild illness with few or no symptoms to a serious condition requiring hospitalization. Acute hepatitis B refers to the first 6 months after someone is infected with the hepatitis B virus. Some people are able to fight the virus and clear the infection. For others, the infection remains and leads to a “chronic,” or lifelong, illness. Chronic hepatitis B refers to the illness that occurs when the hepatitis B virus remains in a person’s body. Over time, the infection can cause serious damage to the liver and lead to complications such as liver failure or liver cancer. How is hepatitis B spread? The hepatitis B virus is usually spread when blood or other body fluids from a person infected with the hepatitis B virus enters the body of someone who is not infected. Hepatitis B can be spread through sharing needles, syringes, or other injection equipment. In addition, the hepatitis B virus can spread through sexual contact and from an infected mother to her baby during childbirth. Why is hepatitis B relevant to people with diabetes? Among people living with diabetes, the hepatitis B virus has been spread through contact with infectious blood. People living with diabetes are at increased risk for hepatitis B if they share blood glucose meters, fingerstick devices or other diabetes-care equipment such as syringes or insulin pens. How infectious is the hepatitis B virus? The hepatitis B virus is 50 – 100 times more infectious than HIV which makes it easily transmitted. The hepatitis B virus can survive outside the body at least a week. During that time, the virus can still cause infection if it enters the body of a person who is not inf

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