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A randomized-controlled trial to assess the effect of ibuprofen on postpartum blood pressure in women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

Authors
  • Triebwasser, Jourdan E1
  • Hesson, Ashley2
  • Langen, Elizabeth S3
  • 1 Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan, L4000 University Hospital South, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5276, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
  • 2 Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan, L4000 University Hospital South, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5276, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
  • 3 Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan, L4000 University Hospital South, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5276, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Pregnancy hypertension
Publication Date
Oct 03, 2019
Volume
18
Pages
117–121
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.preghy.2019.09.012
PMID: 31586784
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To test the hypothesis that ibuprofen is equivalent to acetaminophen in its effect on postpartum blood pressure in women with gestational hypertension or preeclampsia without severe features. Single-center randomized, crossover, equivalence trial among women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy without severe features after vaginal delivery. Participants were assigned in a double-blind fashion to ibuprofen 600 mg or acetaminophen 650 mg every 6 h for 24 h followed by crossover to the other drug. We assessed clinical blood pressures and ambulatory blood pressure monitor measurements. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed using a linear mixed model adjusted for time period. The mean difference in systolic blood pressure through 24 h of drug exposure with an equivalence margin of 10 mmHg. Of 185 screened women, 74 enrolled prior to delivery. Forty-three women remained eligible and were randomized to ibuprofen first (n = 20, 46.5%) or acetaminophen first (n = 23, 53.5%). A total of 37 women (86.0%) received study drug (ibuprofen first n = 19, acetaminophen first n = 18). Most participants were white (91.9%) and had gestational hypertension (86.5%); mean (SD) age was 31.0 (6.5) years. The mean adjusted difference in systolic blood pressure was 1.0 mmHg (95% CI, -3.7 to 5.7 mmHg), which was within the equivalence margin. A linear mixed model did not demonstrate a main effect of group assignment, nor did it show an interaction effect with time period. Among women with gestational hypertension and preeclampsia without severe features, ibuprofen is an equally safe option as acetaminophen with respect to postpartum blood pressure concerns. Copyright © 2019 International Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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