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Raman spectroscopy accurately classifies burn severity in an ex vivo model.

Authors
  • Ye, Hanglin1
  • Rahul,2
  • Kruger, Uwe2
  • Wang, Tianmeng3
  • Shi, Sufei3
  • Norfleet, Jack4
  • De, Suvranu5
  • 1 Center for Modeling, Simulation and Imaging in Medicine (CeMSIM), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Center for Modeling, Simulation and Imaging in Medicine (CeMSIM), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.
  • 3 The Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.
  • 4 U.S. Army Futures Command, Combat Capabilities Development Command Soldier Center STTC, Orlando, FL, USA.
  • 5 Center for Modeling, Simulation and Imaging in Medicine (CeMSIM), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Burns : journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries
Publication Date
Aug 31, 2020
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.burns.2020.08.006
PMID: 32928613
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Accurate classification of burn severities is of vital importance for proper burn treatments. A recent article reported that using the combination of Raman spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) classifies different degrees of burns with an overall accuracy of 85% [1]. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy alone to classify burn severities on ex vivo porcine skin tissues. To create different levels of burns, four burn conditions were designed: (i) 200°F for 10s, (ii) 200°F for 30s, (iii) 450°F for 10s and (iv) 450°F for 30s. Raman spectra from 500-2000cm-1 were collected from samples of the four burn conditions as well as the unburnt condition. Classifications were performed using kernel support vector machine (KSVM) with features extracted from the spectra by principal component analysis (PCA), and partial least-square (PLS). Both techniques yielded an average accuracy of approximately 92%, which was independently evaluated by leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV). By comparison, PCA+KSVM provides higher accuracy in classifying severe burns, while PLS performs better in classifying mild burns. Variable importance in the projection (VIP) scores from the PLS models reveal that proteins and lipids, amide III, and amino acids are important indicators in separating unburnt or mild burns (200°F), while amide I has a more pronounced impact in separating severe burns (450°F). Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

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