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Radio's role in popular education.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Ceres
Publication Date
Volume
21
Issue
2
Pages
16–18
Identifiers
PMID: 12282828
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Many theorists in the 1950's and 1960's thought that mass communications media would be a major factor in integrating and modernizing developing countries. International organizations and Western governments supported educational programs on sanitation and agriculture technology for developing countries. However, Western technology did not suit the rural areas of the developing world. The programs often did not reach the people who needed them the most, but only the educated few. The Catholic church has developed a radio network in Colombia that combines commercial and cultural or religious programs. In addition, 42 church organizations are producing radio programs in Latin America. Most of these programs have not been successful in formal education in history, health care, and agriculture technology. This indicates that radio may not be a good medium for scientific information; audiences don't listen often enough and concentrate adequately to gain from this kind of teaching. It can, however, be effective in spreading cultural information and voicing opinions and views. Educational radio programming is useful when the subject matter is closely linked to specific problems in the community. It must be expressed in the terms of the local audience, as in the rural areas of Latin America. Presentations should not be in the teacher format but in forums, dramas, and documentary reports, and delivered in the local language.

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