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Cancer risk in 680,000 people exposed to computed tomography scans in childhood or adolescence: data linkage study of 11 million Australians.

Authors
  • Mathews, John D1
  • Forsythe, Anna V
  • Brady, Zoe
  • Butler, Martin W
  • Goergen, Stacy K
  • Byrnes, Graham B
  • Giles, Graham G
  • Wallace, Anthony B
  • Anderson, Philip R
  • Guiver, Tenniel A
  • McGale, Paul
  • Cain, Timothy M
  • Dowty, James G
  • Bickerstaffe, Adrian C
  • Darby, Sarah C
  • 1 School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Carlton, Vic 3053, Australia.
Type
Published Article
Journal
BMJ
Publisher
BMJ
Publication Date
May 21, 2013
Volume
346
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1136/bmj.f2360
PMID: 23694687
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The increased incidence of cancer after CT scan exposure in this cohort was mostly due to irradiation. Because the cancer excess was still continuing at the end of follow-up, the eventual lifetime risk from CT scans cannot yet be determined. Radiation doses from contemporary CT scans are likely to be lower than those in 1985-2005, but some increase in cancer risk is still likely from current scans. Future CT scans should be limited to situations where there is a definite clinical indication, with every scan optimised to provide a diagnostic CT image at the lowest possible radiation dose.

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