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Radial oxygen loss is correlated with nitrogen nutrition in mangroves.

Authors
  • Cheng, Hao1
  • Liu, Yong2
  • Jiang, Zhao-Yu1, 3
  • Wang, You-Shao1
  • 1 State Key Laboratory of Tropical Oceanography and Daya Bay Marina Biology Research Station, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 164th Xingang West Road, Guangzhou 510301, China. , (China)
  • 2 Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Mariculture Ecology and Products Quality and Safety, South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, 231th Xingang West Road, Guangzhou 510300, China. , (China)
  • 3 College of Life Sciences, Linyi University, middle-region of Shuangling Road, Linyi 276000, China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Tree Physiology
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Oct 29, 2020
Volume
40
Issue
11
Pages
1548–1560
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/treephys/tpaa089
PMID: 32705132
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The present study aimed to explore the possible functions of radial oxygen loss (ROL) on mangrove nutrition. A field survey was conducted to explore the relations among ROL, root anatomy and leaf N in different mangrove species along a continuous tidal gradient. Three mangroves with different ROL (Avicennia marina [A. marina], Kandelia obovata and Rhizophora stylosa) were then selected to further explore the dynamics of N at the root-soil interface. The results showed that seaward pioneer mangrove species such as A. marina appeared to exhibit higher leaf N despite growing under poorer nutrient conditions. Greater leaf N in pioneer mangroves coincided with their special root structure (e.g., high porosity together with a thin lignified/suberized exodermis) and powerful ROL. An interesting positive relation was observed between ROL and leaf N in mangroves. Moreover, rhizo-box data further showed that soil nitrification was also strongly correlated with ROL. A. marina, which had the highest ROL among the three mangrove species studied, consistently possessed the highest levels of NO3-, nitrification and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea gene copies in the rhizosphere. Besides, both NO3- and NH4+ influxes were found to be higher in the roots of A. marina when compared to those of K. obovata and R. stylosa. In summary, greater N acquisition by pioneer mangroves such as A. marina was strongly correlated with ROL which would regulate N transformation and translocation at the root-soil interface. The implications of this study may be significant in mangrove nutrition and the mechanisms involved in mangrove zonation. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: [email protected]

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