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Racial/ethnic differences in treatment quality among youth with primary care provider-initiated versus mental health specialist-initiated care for major depressive disorders.

Authors
  • Yucel, Aylin1
  • Sanyal, Swarnava1
  • Essien, Ekere J1
  • Mgbere, Osaro2
  • Aparasu, Rajender1
  • Bhatara, Vinod S3
  • Alonzo, Joy P1
  • Chen, Hua1
  • 1 Department of Pharmaceutical Health Outcomes and Policy, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA.
  • 2 Bureau of Epidemiology, Houston Health Department, Houston, TX, USA.
  • 3 Department of Psychiatry, Sanford School of Medicine, University of South Dakota, Sioux Falls, SD, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Child and adolescent mental health
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2020
Volume
25
Issue
1
Pages
28–35
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/camh.12359
PMID: 32285643
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To compare the racial/ethnic differences in treatment quality among youth with primary care provider-initiated versus mental health specialist-initiated care for major depressive disorders (MDD). A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the 2005-2007 Medicaid claims data from Texas. Youth aged 10-20 during the study period were identified if they had two consecutive MDD diagnoses and received either medications for MDD or psychotherapy. Patients who received ≥84 days of medications and/or ≥4 sessions of psychotherapy for MDD treatment during 4 months of follow-up were considered meeting the minimum adequacy of treatment. The generalized linear multilevel model (MLM) analysis revealed that both Hispanics and Blacks were approximately 30% less likely to receive adequate treatment (Hispanics - OR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.6-0.8) (Blacks - OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.6-0.8) and Hispanic children were 50% more likely to undergo MH-related hospitalization (OR: 1.53; 95% CI: 1.1-2.2) compared to their White counterparts. The odds of meeting the minimum MDD treatment adequacy were comparable between pediatric MDD cases first identified by primary care providers (PCP-I) and psychiatrists (PSY-I) (PCP-I vs. PSY-I: OR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.8-1.2), and slightly lower in those first identified by social workers/psychologists (SWP-I) as compared to PSY-I (SWP-I vs. PSY-I: OR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.7-0.9). In all models, the interaction between race/ethnicity and type of provider who initiated MDD care was not statistically significant. Minority youths received less adequate MDD treatment compared to Whites. Hispanic children had the highest risk of having mental health-related hospitalization. The specialty of provider who initiated MDD care had limited impact on treatment quality and was not associated with the racial/ethnic variations in treatment completion and mental health-related hospitalizations. © 2019 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

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