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Racial-Ethnic Composition of Primary Care Practices and Comprehensive Primary Care Plus Initiative Participation.

Authors
  • Rubio, Karl1
  • Fraze, Taressa K2
  • Bibi, Salma1
  • Rodriguez, Hector P3
  • 1 Division of Health Policy and Management, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA.
  • 2 Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • 3 Division of Health Policy and Management, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA. [email protected].
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2023
Volume
38
Issue
13
Pages
2945–2952
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11606-023-08160-0
PMID: 36941423
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

It remains unclear whether the racial-ethnic composition or the socioeconomic profiles of eligible primary care practices better explain practice participation in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) Comprehensive Primary Care Plus (CPC+) program. To examine whether practices serving high proportions of Black or Latino Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries were less likely to participate in CPC+ in 2021 compared to practices serving lower proportions of these populations. 2019 IQVIA OneKey data on practice characteristics was linked with 2018 CMS claims data and 2021 CMS CPC+ participation data. Medicare FFS beneficiaries were attributed to practices using CMS's primary care attribution method. 11,718 primary care practices and 7,264,812 attributed Medicare FFS beneficiaries across 18 eligible regions. Multivariable logistic regression models examined whether eligible practices with relatively high shares of Black or Latino Medicare FFS beneficiaries were less likely to participate in CPC+ in 2021, controlling for the clinical and socioeconomic profiles of practices. Proportion of Medicare FFS beneficiaries attributed to each practice that are (1) Latino and (2) Black. Of the eligible practices, 26.9% were CPC+ participants. In adjusted analyses, practices with relatively high shares of Black (adjusted odds ratio, aOR = 0.62, p < 0.05) and Latino (aOR = 0.32, p < 0.01) beneficiaries were less likely to participate in CPC+ compared to practices with lower shares of these beneficiary groups. State differences in CPC+ participation rates partially explained participation disparities for practices with relatively high shares of Black beneficiaries, but did not explain participation disparities for practices with relatively high shares of Latino beneficiaries. The racial-ethnic composition of eligible primary care practices is more strongly associated with CPC+ participation than census tract-level poverty. Practice eligibility requirements for CMS-sponsored initiatives should be reconsidered so that Black and Latino beneficiaries are not left out of the benefits of practice transformation. © 2023. The Author(s).

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