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Racial and Ethnic Differences in the Epidemiology and Genomics of Lung Cancer.

Authors
  • Schabath, Matthew B1
  • Cress, Douglas
  • Munoz-Antonia, Teresita
  • 1 Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cancer control : journal of the Moffitt Cancer Center
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2016
Volume
23
Issue
4
Pages
338–346
Identifiers
PMID: 27842323
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Lung cancer is the most common cancer in the world. In addition to the geographical and sex-specific differences in the incidence, mortality, and survival rates of lung cancer, growing evidence suggests that racial and ethnic differences exist. We reviewed published data related to racial and ethnic differences in lung cancer. Current knowledge and substantive findings related to racial and ethnic differences in lung cancer were summarized, focusing on incidence, mortality, survival, cigarette smoking, prevention and early detection, and genomics. Systems-level and health care professional-related issues likely to contribute to specific racial and ethnic health disparities were also reviewed to provide possible suggestions for future strategies to reduce the disproportionate burden of lung cancer. Although lung carcinogenesis is a multifactorial process driven by exogenous exposures, genetic variations, and an accumulation of somatic genetic events, it appears to have racial and ethnic differences that in turn impact the observed epidemiological differences in rates of incidence, mortality, and survival.

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