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Racial Differences in the Effect of HIV Status on Motor and Pulmonary Function and Mobility Disability in Older Adults.

Authors
  • Lange-Maia, Brittney S1, 2
  • Buchman, Aron S3, 4
  • Leurgans, Sue E3, 4
  • Lamar, Melissa3, 5
  • Lynch, Elizabeth B6
  • Erlandson, Kristine M7
  • Barnes, Lisa L3, 4
  • 1 Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA. [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA. [email protected]
  • 3 Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.
  • 4 Department of Neurological Sciences Rush, University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.
  • 5 Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.
  • 6 Department of Preventive Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.
  • 7 Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center, Aurora, CO, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2022
Volume
9
Issue
5
Pages
1888–1896
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s40615-021-01126-0
PMID: 34403124
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Older Black adults face a disproportionate burden of HIV prevalence, but less is known about racial disparities in age-related outcomes in HIV. We assessed the effect of HIV status and race on motor and pulmonary function, as well as how they contribute to mobility disability. Community-based study; Chicago, IL METHODS: Participants were 363 community-dwelling adults age ≥ 50 years, 48% living with HIV, and 68% Black. Participants with HIV were recruited from a specialty HIV clinic, and participants without HIV (comparable on key demographic, lifestyle, and behavioral characteristics) were recruited from the community. Measures included motor function summarized by 10 motor performance measures, pulmonary function summarized by 3 measures assessed using handheld spirometry, and self-reported mobility disability. In fully adjusted linear models, HIV was associated with better motor (β = 9.35, p < 0.001) and pulmonary function (β = 16.34, p < 0.001). For pulmonary function, the effect of HIV status was moderated by race (interaction between Black race and HIV status: β = - 11.66, p = 0.02), indicating that better pulmonary function among participants with HIV was less evident among Black participants. In fully adjusted models, odds of mobility disability did not differ by race, HIV status, or pulmonary function; better motor function was associated with lower odds of mobility disability (OR = 0.91 per 1-point higher, 95% CI 0.88-0.93). Better motor and pulmonary function exhibited by participants with HIV could reflect access to medical care. Racial differences in lung function among participants with HIV indicate potential disparities in prevention or treatment of pulmonary disease or underlying risk factors. © 2021. W. Montague Cobb-NMA Health Institute.

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