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Race and overall survival in men diagnosed with prostate cancer in the Department of Defense Military Health System, 1990–2010

Authors
  • Alexander, Melannie1, 2
  • Zhu, Kangmin2
  • Cullen, Jennifer3
  • Byrne, Celia1
  • Brown, Derek2
  • Shao, Stephanie2
  • Rusiecki, Jennifer1
  • 1 Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD, 20814, USA , Bethesda (United States)
  • 2 Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, John P. Murtha Cancer Center, Bethesda, MD, USA , Bethesda (United States)
  • 3 Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, Center for Prostate Disease Research, Bethesda, MD, USA , Bethesda (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cancer Causes & Control
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Apr 17, 2019
Volume
30
Issue
6
Pages
627–635
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10552-019-01163-5
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

BackgroundIn the U.S. general population, black men experience poorer survival after prostate cancer (CaP) diagnosis compared to white men, and findings may be impacted by unequal access to healthcare. The objective of the study is to investigate racial differences in overall survival (OS) among Department of Defense beneficiaries diagnosed with CaP.MethodsA retrospective cohort study was conducted utilizing the Automated Central Tumor Registry within the Military Healthcare System, a system designed to provide equal access. Men diagnosed with primary prostate adenocarcinomas between 1990 and 2010 [n = 18,484; 24% Non-Hispanic black (NHB), 76% Non-Hispanic white (NHW)] were followed through 2013 for vital status. Unadjusted Kaplan–Meier estimation curves and multivariable Cox proportional hazards (PH) regression models were used to examine racial differences in OS.ResultsAge-specific Kaplan–Meier analyses showed equivalent OS for NHW and NHB men in all age groups, except for 75+, where NHB had poorer OS (p = 0.0048). Multivariable Cox PH models revealed no significant differences in OS for race (HR 1.02; 95% CI 0.95–1.08), except in men aged ≥ 75 years, where NHB men had poorer OS (HR 1.27; 95% CI 1.08–1.49).ConclusionsFindings suggest that in a healthcare system designed for equal access, disparities in OS among men diagnosed with CaP may not exist.

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