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Race and beliefs about mental health treatment among anxious primary care patients.

Authors
  • Hunt, Justin
  • Sullivan, Greer
  • Chavira, Denise A
  • Stein, Murray B
  • Craske, Michelle G
  • Golinelli, Daniela
  • Roy-Byrne, Peter P
  • Sherbourne, Cathy D
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease
Publisher
Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer) - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2013
Volume
201
Issue
3
Pages
188–195
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1097/NMD.0b013e3182845ad8
PMID: 23407203
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Large racial disparities in the use of mental health care persist. Differences in treatment preferences could partially explain the differences in care between minority and nonminority populations. We compared beliefs about mental illness and treatment preferences between adult African-Americans, Hispanics, Asian Americans, Native Americans, and White Americans with diagnosed anxiety disorders. Measures of beliefs about mental illness and treatment were drawn from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication and from our previous work. There were no significant differences in beliefs between the African-Americans and the White Americans. The beliefs of the Hispanics and the Native Americans were most distinctive, but the differences were small in magnitude. Across race/ethnicity, the associations between beliefs and service use were generally weak and statistically insignificant. The differences in illness beliefs and treatment preferences do not fully explain the large, persistent racial disparities in mental health care. Other crucial barriers to quality care exist in our health care system and our society as a whole.

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