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Quick identification of acetic acid bacteria based on nucleotide sequences of the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer region and of the PQQ-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase gene.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Systematic and Applied Microbiology
0723-2020
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
28
Issue
8
Pages
735–745
Identifiers
PMID: 16261863
Source
Medline

Abstract

Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are well known for oxidizing different ethanol-containing substrates into various types of vinegar. They are also used for production of some biotechnologically important products, such as sorbose and gluconic acids. However, their presence is not always appreciated since certain species also spoil wine, juice, beer and fruits. To be able to follow AAB in all these processes, the species involved must be identified accurately and quickly. Because of inaccuracy and very time-consuming phenotypic analysis of AAB, the application of molecular methods is necessary. Since the pairwise comparison among the 16S rRNA gene sequences of AAB shows very high similarity (up to 99.9%) other DNA-targets should be used. Our previous studies showed that the restriction analysis of 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer region is a suitable approach for quick affiliation of an acetic acid bacterium to a distinct group of restriction types and also for quick identification of a potentially novel species of acetic acid bacterium (Trcek & Teuber 2002; Trcek 2002). However, with the exception of two conserved genes, encoding tRNAIle and tRNAAla, the sequences of 16S-23S rDNA are highly divergent among AAB species. For this reason we analyzed in this study a gene encoding PQQ-dependent ADH as a possible DNA-target. First we confirmed the expression of subunit I of PQQ-dependent ADH (AdhA) also in Asaia, the only genus of AAB which exhibits little or no ADH-activity. Further we analyzed the partial sequences of adhA among some representative species of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The conserved and variable regions in these sequences made possible the construction of A. acetispecific oligonucleotide the specificity of which was confirmed in PCR-reaction using 45 well-defined strains of AAB as DNA-templates. The primer was also successfully used in direct identification of A. aceti from home made cider vinegar as well as for revealing the misclassification of strain IFO 3283 into the species A. aceti.

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