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Questions Answered and Unanswered by the First CRISPR Editing Study in a Canine Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

Authors
  • Wasala, Nalinda B1
  • Hakim, Chady H1, 2
  • Chen, Shi-Jie3, 4
  • Yang, N Nora2
  • Duan, Dongsheng1, 5, 6, 7
  • 1 1 Department of Molecular Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Missouri, Columbia.
  • 2 2 National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland.
  • 3 3 Department of Physics, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Missouri, Columbia.
  • 4 4 Department of Biochemistry, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Missouri, Columbia.
  • 5 5 Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Missouri, Columbia.
  • 6 6 Department of Bioengineering, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Missouri, Columbia.
  • 7 7 Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Missouri, Columbia.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Human Gene Therapy
Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Publication Date
May 01, 2019
Volume
30
Issue
5
Pages
535–543
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1089/hum.2018.243
PMID: 30648435
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) editing is being considered as a potential gene repair therapy to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a dystrophin-deficient lethal muscle disease affecting all muscles in the body. A recent preliminary study from the Olson laboratory (Amoasii et al. Science 2018;362:89-91) showed robust dystrophin restoration in a canine Duchenne muscular dystrophy model following intramuscular or intravenous delivery of the CRISPR editing machinery by adeno-associated virus serotype 9. Despite the limitation of the small sample size, short study duration, and the lack of muscle function data, the Olson lab findings have provided important proof of principle for scaling up CRISPR therapy from rodents to large mammals. Future large-scale, long-term, and comprehensive studies are warranted to establish the safety and efficacy of CRISPR editing therapy in large mammals.

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