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A questionnaire investigation on factors of importance for the development of anthelmintic resistance of nematodes in sow herds in Denmark.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Veterinary Parasitology
0304-4017
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
63
Issue
3-4
Pages
257–271
Identifiers
PMID: 8966992
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

A questionnaire survey on the use of anthelmintics and presence of other potential risk factors for the development of anthelmintic resistance of nematodes in 136 Danish sow herds was carried out between November 1992-February 1993. Twenty one veterinarians who specialize in diseases of pigs administered the questionnaire in personal interviews during their regular visits to the respective pig farmers. In the study population, 91% of the farmers currently treated their sows with anthelmintics, while only 38% and 14% treated their weaners and fatteners, respectively. Most respondents treated their sows either before or after farrowing (40%) or once every 6 months (27%). Benzimidazole and pro-benzimidazole (Class I) anthelmintics were the most used in sows by the farmers (39%, 47%, 49%, 50%, 46%, and 47% during the years 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991 and 1992, respectively). When sows were treated, fenbendazole was the most frequently used anthelmintic during the period 1987-1992 (30%-39%). The proportion of farmers that used Class II (pyrantel and levamisole) or Class III (ivermectin and piperazine) anthelmintics during the year 1992 were 25% and 13%, respectively. Of the 70 farmers who used anthelmintics from either Class I, II or III during the study period, 44 farmers always used the same class of drugs. Eight herd owners among those 44, had changed the pharmaceutical product within the same class. Sixty nine percent of the farmers did not weight the sows, but used visual appraisal of average body.

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