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Quality and Safety in Healthcare, Part LXVIII: Consequences and More Solutions Regarding Poor Well-Being in Medical Students.

Authors
  • Harolds, Jay A1
  • 1 From the Advanced Radiology Services and the Division of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, Grand Rapids, MI.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical nuclear medicine
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
46
Issue
4
Pages
323–325
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1097/RLU.0000000000002985
PMID: 32149804
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Suggestions to improve the well-being in medical students include establishing learning communities, having pass-fail grading at least in the freshman and sophomore years, giving the students some control over their learning environment (such as with evaluations and serving on the curriculum committee), encouraging more protected time and more money for faculty teaching and mentoring, and eliminating mistreatment of medical students. Also, the Medical Student and Physician Well-Being Index should be freely available to the medical students and staff for both self-evaluation and for evaluating the learning environment. Burnout in medical school may continue in residency and not only causes misery to the individual, but adversely affects professionalism and patient care. Copyright © 2020 American College of Nuclear Medicine.

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