Affordable Access

[Quality analysis of internet information on epicondylitis radialis humeri].

Authors
  • Pennekamp, P H1
  • Kraft, C N
  • von Engelhardt, L V
  • Burian, B
  • Schmitt, O
  • Diedrich, O
  • 1 Klinik und Poliklinik für Orthopädie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität zu Bonn. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Zeitschrift fur Orthopadie und ihre Grenzgebiete
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2006
Volume
144
Issue
2
Pages
218–222
Identifiers
PMID: 16625454
Source
Medline
Language
German
License
Unknown

Abstract

By means of conventional internet search engines we assessed the World Wide Web for the topic "epicondylitis radialis humeri" and analysed the content of the listed pages for their quality and transparency. Three of the most frequently used internet search engines were utilised to search the World Wide Web for the terms "tennis arm", "tennis elbow" and "epicondylitis". The first 50 listed internet addresses per search engine were scrutinised in respect to the authors' source, financier of the web page and whether commercial interests were evident. Furthermore, the medical content concerning radial epicondylitis was analysed using a 10-point score. After elimination of repetitive and not accessible internet pages, as well as web pages only giving links to further web-sites or chat-rooms, we were able to evaluate 137 internet sites. The average content-score of all pages was low with 2.91 +/- 3.27 SD. Web-pages, where authorship could not be identified or where commercial interests were clearly evident, had the lowest content-scores. Sites authored by or associated with orthopaedic surgeons had a significantly higher content-score (6.84 +/- 3.17 SD) in comparison to other initiators of web-pages (p < 0.0001). The facts derived from the World Wide Web when searching for information on epicondylitis radialis humeri are mostly of low professional quality and transparency. Orthopaedic surgeons need to point out this problem to patients who additionally inform themselves on the internet. If the desire for browsing the web for further information concerning musculoskeletal pathology exists, orthopaedic surgeons should tell their patients which web sites are suitable.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times