Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Pulmonary Foreign Body Granulomatosis after Cosmetic Injection

Authors
  • Kim, Hyun Soo
  • Gil, Bo-Mi
  • Kang, Hye Seon
  • Kim, Jeana
  • Kim, Chung Ho
  • Chung, Myung Hee
Type
Published Article
Journal
Respiration
Publisher
S. Karger AG
Publication Date
Jan 05, 2024
Volume
103
Issue
1
Pages
41–46
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1159/000535594
PMID: 38185117
Source
Karger
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Novel Insights from Clinical Practice
License
Green
External links

Abstract

Introduction: We occasionally encounter irregular marginated masses discovered incidentally in young individuals. In most cases, further investigations are conducted to assess the presence of a primary malignancy, as these masses often raise suspicions of malignancy. However, rare exceptional cases leave us perplexed. Granulomas arising from common lung infections and those induced by foreign substances can often pose challenge in distinguishing them from lung cancer. Therefore, we aimed to present a case of multiple pulmonary granulomatosis following cosmetic procedure. Case Presentation: A 55-year-old woman visited the hospital after an incidental discovery of an abnormal chest radiograph during a routine health check-up. Subsequent computed tomography (CT) scans showed worrisome lung nodules, leading to biopsies and positron emission tomography CT scans. Histological examination of the biopsied specimens revealed a chronic inflammatory reaction surrounded by multinucleated foreign body giant cells. Upon sharing the biopsy results with the patient and conducting additional history-taking, she had undergone various cosmetic procedures (botox injection, dermal filler treatments, and thread lifts) around the face and neck, approximately 5–6 months ago. It was hypothesized that these cosmetic materials might have led to the observed pulmonary granulomatosis. After 3 months of conservative care, a follow-up CT showed no change in the lesions. Conclusion: We present this case to underscore the importance of considering pulmonary foreign body granulomatosis as a potential differential diagnosis, especially when it closely resembles lung cancer, particularly following cosmetic injections.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times