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PTSD is associated with an increase in aged T cell phenotypes in adults living in Detroit.

Authors
  • Aiello, Allison E1
  • Dowd, Jennifer B2
  • Jayabalasingham, Bamini3
  • Feinstein, Lydia4
  • Uddin, Monica5
  • Simanek, Amanda M6
  • Cheng, Caroline K7
  • Galea, Sandro8
  • Wildman, Derek E9
  • Koenen, Karestan10
  • Pawelec, Graham11
  • 1 Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 CUNY School of Public Health, Hunter College, City University of New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 3 CUNY School of Public Health, Hunter College, City University of New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 4 Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 5 Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 6 Joseph J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 7 School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 8 Boston University School of Public Health, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 9 Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 10 Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 11 Department of Internal Medicine II, Centre for Medical Research, University of Tubingen, Tubingen, Germany. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Psychoneuroendocrinology
Publication Date
May 01, 2016
Volume
67
Pages
133–141
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2016.01.024
PMID: 26894484
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Psychosocial stress is thought to play a key role in the acceleration of immunological aging. This study investigated the relationship between lifetime and past-year history of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the distribution of T cell phenotypes thought to be characteristic of immunological aging. Data were from 85 individuals who participated in the community-based Detroit Neighborhood Health Study. Immune markers assessed included the CD4:CD8 ratio, the ratio of late-differentiated effector (CCR7-CD45RA+CD27-CD28-) to naïve (CCR7+CD45RA+CD27+CD28+) T cells, the percentage of KLRG1-expressing cells, and the percentage of CD57-expressing cells. In models adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, smoking status, and medication use, we found that past-year PTSD was associated with statistically significant differences in the CD8+ T cell population, including a higher ratio of late-differentiated effector to naïve T cells, a higher percentage of KLRG1+ cells, and a higher percentage of CD57+ cells. The percentage of CD57+ cells in the CD4 subset was also significantly higher and the CD4:CD8 ratio significantly lower among individuals who had experienced past-year PTSD. Lifetime PTSD was also associated with differences in several parameters of immune aging. PTSD is associated with an aged immune phenotype and should be evaluated as a potential catalyzer of accelerated immunological aging in future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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