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Psychosocial stress and liver disease status.

Authors
  • Vere, Cristin Constantin
  • Streba, Costin Teodor
  • Streba, Letitia Maria
  • Ionescu, Alin Gabriel
  • Sima, Felix
Type
Published Article
Journal
World Journal of Gastroenterology
Publisher
Baishideng Publishing Group Co
Publication Date
Jun 28, 2009
Volume
15
Issue
24
Pages
2980–2986
Identifiers
PMID: 19554650
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

"Psychosocial stress" is an increasingly common concept in the challenging and highly-demanding modern society of today. Organic response to stress implicates two major components of the stress system, namely the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathetic nervous system. Stress is anamnestically reported by patients during the course of disease, usually accompanied by a decline in their overall health status. As the mechanisms involving glucocorticoids and catecholamines have been deciphered, and their actions on immune cell function deeper understood, it has become clear that stress has an impact on hepatic inflammatory response. An increasing number of articles have approached the link between psychosocial stress and the negative evolution of hepatic diseases. This article reviews a number of studies on both human populations and animal models performed in recent years, all linking stress, mainly of psychosocial nature, and the evolution of three important liver-related pathological entities: viral hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

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