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Psychosocial stress, bicultural identity integration, and bicultural self-efficacy among Hispanic emerging adults.

Authors
  • Cano, Miguel Ángel1
  • Marsiglia, Flavio F2
  • Meca, Alan3
  • De La Rosa, Mario1
  • Ramírez-Ortiz, Daisy1
  • Sánchez, Mariana1
  • Colón Burgos, José Félix1
  • Alamilla, Saul G4
  • Wuyke, Gabriella1
  • Parras, Daniel1
  • Ali, Syed Zain1
  • Forney, Derrick J1
  • Varas-Rodríguez, Emil1
  • Ruvalcaba, Yanet1
  • Contreras, Andrea1
  • Ahmed, Shyfuddin1
  • Vega-Luna, Beatriz2
  • Ochoa, Lucas G5
  • Cuadra, Rebecca6
  • Domínguez García, Mario J7
  • 1 Florida International University, Miami, Florida, USA.
  • 2 Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA.
  • 3 Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, USA.
  • 4 Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, Georgia, USA. , (Georgia)
  • 5 Univerity of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA.
  • 6 Columbia University, New York City, New York, USA.
  • 7 Instituto Nacional de Psiquiatría, Mexico City, Mexico. , (Mexico)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Stress and health : journal of the International Society for the Investigation of Stress
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
37
Issue
2
Pages
392–398
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/smi.2993
PMID: 33002313
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Most studies on psychosocial stress among Hispanics have focused on risk factors. To better understand psychosocial stress among this population, this study aimed to examine components of bicultural identity integration and bicultural self-efficacy, that may be associated with lower psychosocial stress among Hispanic emerging adults (ages 18-25). This aim was tested on a cross-sectional sample of Hispanic emerging adults (Mage = 21.30, SD = 2.09) that included 200 participants (Arizona n = 99, Florida n = 101). The sample included men (n = 98) and women (n = 102). Most participants were US-born (70%), college students (69.5%), and of Mexican heritage (44%). Standardized coefficients from a hierarchical multiple regression model indicate that higher levels of the bicultural harmony component of bicultural identity integration (β = -0.26, p < 0.001) and the social groundedness component of bicultural self-efficacy (β = -0.23, p < 0.01) were associated with lower levels of psychosocial stress. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine components of bicultural identity integration and bicultural self-efficacy and their respective associations with psychosocial stress among any racial/ethnic group. Thus, more studies are needed to replicate our findings to determine if bicultural identity integration and bicultural self-efficacy should be considered in psychosocial stress interventions for Hispanics. © 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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