Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Psychosocial influences on engagement in care among HIV-positive young black gay/bisexual and other men who have sex with men.

Authors
  • Hussen, Sophia A1
  • Harper, Gary W
  • Bauermeister, Jose A
  • Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B
  • 1 1 Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University , Atlanta, Georgia . , (Georgia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
AIDS Patient Care and STDs
Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2015
Volume
29
Issue
2
Pages
77–85
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1089/apc.2014.0117
PMID: 25682888
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Young black gay/bisexual and other men who have sex with men (YB-GBMSM) living with HIV are at risk for poor engagement in HIV care. Relatively little is known about factors that impact engagement outcomes at various stages along the HIV care continuum in this specific population. The purpose of this analysis was to examine associations between various psychosocial factors and likelihood of engagement at each stage of the care continuum, among a geographically diverse sample of 132 YB-GBMSM living with HIV. Negative self-image, a component of HIV stigma, had an inverse association with early care seeking after HIV diagnosis (OR=1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.10). Negative self-image was also inversely associated with adherence to medical appointments (OR=0.95; 95% CI 0.91-0.99), while employment (OR=0.30; 95% CI 0.12-0.75) and ethnic identity affirmation (OR=0.28; 95% CI 0.12-0.68) were both positively associated with appointment adherence. HIV-positive identity salience was associated with a higher likelihood of being on antiretroviral therapy (OR=1.06; 95% CI 1.02, 1.09). These findings highlight the importance of processes related to identity development, as both barriers and facilitators of engagement in care for HIV-positive YB-GBMSM.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times